The devices are in use at Y-12 and were invented at the National Nuclear Security Administration site to fulfill a need for systems that delay access to secure areas without requiring electrical power.

SET_Signing_SmallA Knoxville start-up firm has licensed two technologies from the Y-12 National Security Complex that delay entrance to controlled-access areas. The technologies provide a security solution for potential markets including commercial nuclear facilities, pharmaceutical manufacturers, correctional facilities and large sporting venues, as well as other Department of Energy sites.

Sustainable Environment Technologies, LLC (SET), signed the licensing agreements for the Access Rate Control System (ARCS) and the Delayed Latching Mechanism (DLM) on Feb. 8.

“The ARCS and the DLM will help to prevent harmful security incidents, create operational efficiencies for government and private-sector institutions, and keep people safe,” said Dan Hurst, who founded SET to use expertise in physical security, security planning, mechanical engineering, business administration and marketing to commercialize world-class energy research and technologies.

Both devices are in use at Y-12 and were invented at the National Nuclear Security Administration site to fulfill a need for systems that delay access to secure areas without requiring electrical power.

The ARCS is a kit designed for installation on existing or new full-height turnstiles. It generates resistance and slows entry if someone enters at faster-than-normal speed. Exit speeds are unaffected.

The DLM delays the unlatching of gates and doors, requiring a sequence of actions that retract the latch. The delay gives security personnel time to prevent the door or gate from opening if necessary. Personnel inside the gate can operate the latch without the delay feature.

Both devices were invented by Lee Bzorgi, Y-12 senior technical advisor and National Security Technology Center director. Bzorgi’s numerous inventions are often born out of concerns for health or security. The ARCS and the DLM join his Rapid Deployment Shelter System, referred to as a “hospital in a box” by Popular Science magazine, as inventions licensed by Y-12’s Office of Technology Transfer.

The new technologies illustrate Y-12’s goal of finding innovative ways to solve problems, and making sure those solutions are broadly available. “Once we know that something we have invented works, we want to make it possible for someone else to use it,” said Darrel Kohlhorst, president and general manager of B&W Y-12 LLC, which manages and operates Y-12 for the National Nuclear Security Administration. “It’s our job not only to facilitate a license but also to work with the licensee to get it off the ground.”

SET was founded by Dan Hurst, president of Strata-G, LLC, a professional services and consulting firm focused on energy efficiency and environmental stewardship.

Source: B&W Y-12 Public Affairs
Image: B&W Y-12 Public Affairs