A July report released by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology urges efforts to build on progress to date on improving domestic manufacturing competitiveness and encouraging companies to invest in the United States.

White_House_at_NightOn July 17, 2012, the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership Steering Committee, working within the framework of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and co-chaired by Andrew Liveris of Dow Chemical and Susan Hockfield of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, outlined recommendations for spurring investment and positioning the U.S. for long-term leadership in advanced manufacturing. The Committee’s report, Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing, has been endorsed by PCAST, which is led by John P. Holdren, science and technology advisor to the President and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Eric Lander, President of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.

The following is an excerpt from the Committee’s report, Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing:

The Nation’s historic leadership in advanced manufacturing is at risk. The threat to our advanced manufacturing sector places our economy as a whole at risk, jeopardizes our international trade, and, above all, undermines the innovation that our Nation needs to thrive in the future. However, with a sustained focus, alignment of interests, and coordinated action by industry, academia, and government, the Nation can retain its leading position in advanced manufacturing.

PCAST has considered and adopts the recommendations of the AMP Steering Committee. These recommendations fall in three key areas: (1) enabling innovation, (2) securing the talent pipeline, and (3) improving the business climate. They include a call to establish a national network of manufacturing innovation institutes (in line with what you announced on March 9th); an emphasis on investment in community college training of the advanced manufacturing workforce; an approach to evaluate platform manufacturing technologies for collaborative investment; a plan to reinvigorate the image of manufacturing in America; and proposals for trade, tax, regulatory, and energy policies that would level the global playing field for domestic manufacturers.

Click here to read the complete report.

Source: White House Office of Science and Technology Policy