Source: ORNL | News | November 2, 2017

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Bo Shen works with a prototype window air conditioning unit that cools using propane, which lowers costs, increases efficiency and benefits the environment.

Refrigerants – Cooling with propane Cooling homes and small office spaces could become less costly and more efficient with new early stage technology developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

An ORNL-led team formed seamless interfaces between graphene ribbons with different widths, creating a staircase configuration. This configuration has seamless electrical contacts, making the material viable as a building block for next-generation electro

Materials – Ripple effect A semiconducting material with a puckered pentagonal atomic structure, characterized by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could rival graphene and black phosphorus as a viable option for nanoscale electronics.

Semiconductors – Making contact  A new approach developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory creates seamless electrical contacts between precisely controlled nanoribbons of graphene, making the material viable as a building block for next-generation electronic devices.

As hurricanes formed in the Gulf Coast, ORNL activated a computing technique to quickly gather building structure data from Texas’ coastal counties. Credit: Mark Tuttle/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Datasets – Supporting hurricane damage assessments Geospatial scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a novel method to quickly gather building structure datasets that support emergency response teams assessing properties damaged by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

Scientists used neutrons produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discover the molecular mechanism responsible for the flow in a hydrogen-bonding liquid. Credit: Jill Hemman/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Neutrons – Go with the flow Using neutrons produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists discovered the molecular mechanism responsible for the flow in a hydrogen-bonding liquid, which has similar characteristics to the molecular motions in organic molecules such as DNA and proteins.