Scientists at the University of Missouri, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville have created a gold nanoparticle that can transport powerful radioactive particles directly to tumors for treatment.

Gold-Nanoparticle

We’ve all heard that “it’s not wise to use a cannon to kill a mosquito.” But what if you could focus the cannon’s power to concentrate power into a tiny space? In a new study, University of Missouri researchers have demonstrated the ability to harness powerful radioactive particles and direct them toward small cancer tumors while doing negligible damage to healthy organs and tissues. The study is being published this week in PLOS ONE, an international, peer-reviewed and open-access publication.

Typically, when radiation treatment is recommended for cancer patients, doctors are able to choose from several radiopharmaceuticals that use low-energy radiation particles, known as beta particles. For years, scientists have been studying how to use “alpha particles,” which are radioactive particles that contain a large amount of energy, in cancer treatments. The challenges to using alpha particles, which are more than 7,000 times heavier than beta particles, include confining the powerful alpha particles in a designated location inside the body while preventing radiation from wandering to healthy organs and tissues.

“If you think of beta particles as slingshots or arrows, alpha particles would be similar to cannon balls,” said David Robertson, director of research at the MU Research Reactor and professor of chemistry in the College of Arts and Science. “Scientists have had some successes using alpha particles recently, but nothing that can battle different cancers. For example, a current study using radium-223 chloride, which emits alpha particles, has been fast-tracked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because it has been shown to be effective in treating bone cancer. However, it only works for bone cancer because the element, radium, is attracted to the bone and stays there. We believe we have found a solution that will allow us to target alpha particles to other cancer sites in the body in an effective manner.”

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Source: University of Missouri News Bureau | February 4, 2013
Image: University of Missouri News Bureau