New classroom technology would let schools hire fewer, better teachers … and pay them more money.

“The present resistance to innovation [in education] is breathtaking,” Joel Klein writes in The Atlantic this month. The former chancellor of the New York City Department of Education was writing about public high schools, but he might as well have been talking about universities. Despite college costs rising faster in college than any institution in the country including health care, we have the technology to disrupt education, turn brick and mortar lecture halls into global classrooms, and dramatically bring down the cost of a high quality education.

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Entrepreneurs like to say there is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come. Is education innovation that next big idea?

Joel Klein writes, “One of the best things we could do is hire fewer teachers and pay more to the ones we hire.” And technology would get us from here to there:

If you get the best math professors in the world–who are great teachers and who deeply understand math–and match them with great software developers, they can create sophisticated interactive programs that engage kids and empower teachers. Why not start with such a program and then let teachers supplement it differently, depending on the progress of each student?”

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Source: Derek Thompson | The Atlantic