A new study from three prominent education researchers finds the U.S. lags far behind other nations in producing high school students who are highly accomplished in math.

Academic-Chalkboard-CroppedCasting doubts on the United States’ ability to maintain its global edge in scientific innovation, a new study from three prominent education researchers finds that the U.S. lags far behind other nations in producing high school students who are highly accomplished in math. Comparing the percentage of students who achieve advanced scores on a standardized math test in 56 industrialized nations, the study found that the U.S. was significantly outperformed by 30 of the 56.

U. S. Math Performance in Global Perspective: How well does each state do at producing high-achieving students?” was produced by Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, and Ludger Woessmann under the auspices of the journal Education Next and Harvard’s Program on Education Policy and Governance, part of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Taubman Center for State and Local Government. The researchers drew on data culled from the 2005 and 2006 administrations of the National Assessment of Education Progress test and the Program for International Student Assessment test respectively, examining a representative sample of the high school graduating class of 2009 in each of the 56 countries. The study paints a picture of an American educational system that fails to produce high achievers in math at a rate necessary to compete on the international level.

Click here to read the full article.

Source: David A. Kronig | The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News