Researchers at Oregon State University have solved a quest in fundamental material science that has eluded scientists since the 1960s, and could form the basis of a new approach to electronics.

electronicsResearchers at Oregon State University have solved a quest in fundamental material science that has eluded scientists since the 1960s, and could form the basis of a new approach to electronics.

The discovery, just reported online in the professional journal Advanced Materials, outlines the creation for the first time of a high-performance “metal-insulator-metal” diode.

“Researchers have been trying to do this for decades, until now without success,” said Douglas Keszler, a distinguished professor of chemistry at OSU. “Diodes made previously with other approaches always had poor yield and performance.

“This is a fundamental change in the way you could produce electronic products, at high speed on a huge scale at very low cost, even less than with conventional methods,” Keszler said. “It’s a basic way to eliminate the current speed limitations of electrons that have to move through materials.”

A patent has been applied for on the new technology, university officials say. New companies, industries and high-tech jobs may ultimately emerge from this advance, they say.

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Source: ScienceDaily (10/31/10)
Photo: Oregon State University | This image of an asymmetric MIM diode reflects a major advance in materials science that could lead to less costly and higher speed electronic products.