Source: Highsnobiety | Jonathan Sawyer | March 31, 2016.

ORNLs Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration connects a 3D-printed building and vehicle to showcase a new approach to energy use, storage and consumption. Photo credit: Carlos Jones

Click for Video — ORNLs Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration connects a 3D-printed building and vehicle to showcase a new approach to energy use, storage and consumption. Photo credit: Carlos Jones

Award-winning architecture firm SOM has joined forces with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to present the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration project. This 3D-printed building is designed to produce and store renewable power and to share energy wirelessly with a 3D-printed vehicle, which was developed by the DOE.

The five-year collaborative project illustrates the potential of clean energy. The use of bidirectional wireless energy technology and high performance materials come together to achieve independence from the power grid at specific times.

The 3D-printed shack was constructed from C-shape forms that are 38 feet long, 13 feet high and 12 feet wide. By condensing the functions of a traditional wall system, the integrated shell in turn cuts down on material consumption and could ultimately lead to zero-waste construction.

AMIE also boasts a high level of insulate solid surfaces that come together to create an energy-conserving enclosure. The building’s interior ribs are designed to host super high-efficiency, atmospherically insulated panels.

Lastly, the roof of the structure features flexible photovoltaic panels that work together with a natural gas-powered generator to supply energy for lighting as well as the central micro-kitchen, which was produced by General Electric. The interior panels supplement the vehicle energy source and also charge the enclosure’s battery when the fixtures are dormant.

Could this be the future of residential, and eventually commercial, construction?