ModiBots are an example of how 3-D printing can bring life to products that didn’t have the commercial success needed to keep them on store shelves.

ModiBotsToy designer Wayne Losey’s articulating, snap-to-build ModiBots are an example of how 3-D printing can bring life to products and toys that didn’t have the commercial success needed to keep them on store shelves.

Some toys are destined for the trash bin, but for the playthings that are unfairly granted a short run in the stores, 3-D printers can add a new chapter to their story. ModiBots is the exact definition of this, an evolution of a toy design that had unfulfilled promise after a short-lived launch.

Today, what started as a simple figure has expanded into a line of 700 parts. Even more impressive is that his 3-D printed figures cost only $15.00 — pretty close to what the figurines retailed for nearly a decade ago.

Having been burnt by seeing his creations in the bargain bin, Losey is in love with the print-on-demand nature of 3-D printing. “It’s an extremely sustainable business model. There’s no over-purchase of inventory and subsequent mad rush to sell that inventory and invest it back into the next batch,” he says. “Like many software businesses, it’s a constant beta mentality, where it’s tweaked until it works.”

Click here to read the complete article.

Source: Joseph Flaherty | Wired | January 23, 2013
Image: Wayne Losey, ModiBots | Wired