Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

The development of the budget request was undoubtedly made more difficult because Congress has not passed any of the FY 2011 appropriations bills.

White-House-2The White House announced that the Administration will send its FY 2012 budget request to Congress on Monday, February 14. The submission is a week later than usual because the confirmation of the new director of the Office of Management and Budget was delayed.

The development of the budget request was undoubtedly made more difficult because Congress has not passed any of the FY 2011 appropriations bills. Making it even more complicated is the effort being made by House Republicans to reduce FY 2011 spending to FY 2008 levels.

President Obama recommended in his State of the Union that non-security spending be frozen for five years except for defense, homeland security, and veterans’ programs. Importantly, he advocated that government spending increase for science and education.

Following the speech, the White House released a document providing additional detail about the FY 2012 budget request, selections of which follow:

“In his State of the Union, President Obama spoke of the need to maintain America’s leadership in a rapidly changing world so that our economy is competitive – growing and working for all Americans. To do so, he is putting forward a plan to help the United States win the future by out-innovating, out-educating, and out-building our global competition. At the same time, the President understands the need to reform the way our government does business and take responsibility for our deficit – by investing in what makes America stronger and cutting what doesn’t.

“Innovate: The President is calling for new investments in American innovation. The President’s Budget will help increase the nation’s R&D investments, as a share of GDP, to its highest levels since President Kennedy.”

“Educate: The President understands that to win the future, we have to win the race to educate our children. Building on the success of Race to the Top, he is calling on Congress to re-define and right-size the federal role in education, by replacing No Child Left Behind with a new law that raises expectations, challenges failure, rewards success, and provides greater flexibility for schools to innovate and improve results for their students. The President is also pledging to prepare an additional 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math teachers by the end of the decade.”

Click here to read the full article.

Source: Richard M. Jones | The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News
Photo: The White House